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Middle East on fire
protests, uprising, revolutions, etc...
#1
(Thread title changed to reflect broader discussion on the current situation in the Middle East/North Africa area)

Looks like the Empire has left Tatooine: Army patrolling streets in wake of Tunisian president's departure

Quote:Army tanks and armored personnel carriers patrolled the streets of Tunis Saturday, a day after the prime minister announced that he is the interim president -- the latest development in a story of unrest and public outrage in a tiny but significant corner of the Arab world.

Prime Minister Mohamed Ghannouchi announced Friday on Tunisian state TV that he has taken over the responsibilities of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali -- who ruled the nation since 1987 and fled in a plane Friday with his relatives.

Looks like a big win for the common people to finally effect change in their country...
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#2
I wouldn't be too quick to judge this revolution. So far it seems like the people want change, but the military also wants a new guy in and they could be the ones pulling the strings.

I would wait to see if this wasn't a military coup disguised as a popular uprising (next few weeks will tell).
I am dead but I must still go to work. -The Sixth Sense
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#3
Ok, am I the only person here who read the thread title as "Government of Tunisia topless"?

Anyway, this is good news for the people of Tunisia. Hopefully the new government lives up to its promises, the people get proper representation, and they inspire student/citizen movements with similar values elsewhere in the Africa/Middle Eastern region.
Fry: "What was the purpose of life, anyway?"
Farnsworth: "Who knows? Probably some hogwash about the human spirit."
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#4
Good news for the people of Tunisia, but I wouldn't be quick to think this will lead to more freedom. Just like what happened with the Shah of Iran, the French Monarchy or the Russian Tsar the new guy could end up being as bad or worse then the old guy unless it ends with real democratic change.

(01-15-2011, 07:40 PM)Gaven Scott Wrote: Ok, am I the only person here who read the thread title as "Government of Tunisia topless"?

I did too... I'm afraid to admit... Blushing
Ich tue, was ich tun will
I do what I want to do
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#5
Dammit people of Tunisia, stop being sane. You're suppose to keep the dictatorships, not overthrow them. Now you've put me in a bad position. Realmad
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#6
Good news for the people of Tunisia. Yes

No guarantee that what emerges from this will be a democracy, but at a minimum, there's going to be change (if they were going to send in the troops, they would have already).
"We all change when you think about it, we're all different people, all through our lives, and that's okay, that’s good you gotta keep moving, so long as you remember all the people that you used to be." -Eleventh Doctor
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#7
I sincerely hope this will all end well for the Tunisian people and that the country is on the way to freedom and democracy.

(01-16-2011, 11:13 AM)LukeSkywalker21078 Wrote:
(01-15-2011, 07:40 PM)Gaven Scott Wrote: Ok, am I the only person here who read the thread title as "Government of Tunisia topless"?

I did too... I'm afraid to admit... Blushing

I did too... maybe it's time for a series of "Governments Gone Wild" DVDs...
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#8
You know, I think this might be spreading: After Tunisia, ‘electrified’ Arab world sets sights on brewing revolt in Egypt

Quote:In a sign that an "electrified" Arab world has been inspired by the events in Tunisia to rise up against their governments, opposition leaders in Egypt have called for an open revolt in the country on January 25.

The US branch of the National Association for Change, an umbrella group of activists led by former IAEA chief Mohamed El-Baradei, issued a statement on Tuesday "urging all Egyptians to take to the streets on January 25th to protest the deteriorating conditions caused by the dictatorial Mubarak regime."

The message places El-Baradei -- a prominent figure in the international community since his role in Iraqi weapons inspections in 2002 and 2003 -- in virtually direct conflict with President Hosni Mubarak, who is generally considered an ally of Washington and whose government receives billions in US aid yearly.

There must be something in the water in North Africa... Huh
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#9
The BBC is suggesting that this might be the start of a domino effect in the Middle East, just like what happened in Eastern Europe in 1989. Also, there are now protests in Jordan demanding their Prime Minister resign.

Anyway this goes, 2011 might turn out to be an interesting year.
"We all change when you think about it, we're all different people, all through our lives, and that's okay, that’s good you gotta keep moving, so long as you remember all the people that you used to be." -Eleventh Doctor
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#10
(01-22-2011, 11:38 AM)Atlas32 Wrote: The BBC is suggesting that this might be the start of a domino effect in the Middle East, just like what happened in Eastern Europe in 1989. Also, there are now protests in Jordan demanding their Prime Minister resign.

Anyway this goes, 2011 might turn out to be an interesting year.

Another Autumn of Nations? I wouldn't jump to that conclusion quite yet, but I do believe there will be changes this year...
If you do not hope, you will not find what is beyond your hopes. ~ St. Clement of Alexandra
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#11
there's going to be changes in the middle east this year regardless if they're for good or bad.

let's hope the people of iran goes the way of romania in 1989 and overthrows ahmadinejad. Wink
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#12
Looks like this could spread into Yemen: Yemen arrests anti-government activist and possibly Saudi Arabia: Man dies after setting himself on fire in Saudi Arabia.
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#13
To be honest, I was quite uninformed about the political situation in Tunisia, and it's too early to tell what will ultimately happen, but I've been reading the articles from the past weeks and I think it's great to hear how people there enjoy finally being able to talk freely about politics and all too often about what happened to them under Ben Ali's regime. The atmosphere sounds quite similar to how that of the GDR in 1989 must have felt.
"Will somebody please get this big, walking carpet out of my way?"
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#14
(01-23-2011, 12:12 PM)loyaljedi Wrote: let's hope the people of iran goes the way of romania in 1989 and overthrows ahmadinejad. Wink

How about no. Eek

You don't want all my jackets being destroyed, do you? Wink
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#15
Today is Egypt's day of revolt, I'll be interested to see how this goes down.
"We all change when you think about it, we're all different people, all through our lives, and that's okay, that’s good you gotta keep moving, so long as you remember all the people that you used to be." -Eleventh Doctor
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